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Jackson Latka

Please, Lights. Turn Off. Thanks to @scoutshonorco for the new Study Hall sign! (at Study Hall)

Please, Lights. Turn Off. Thanks to @scoutshonorco for the new Study Hall sign! (at Study Hall)

In his book Bagombo Snuff Box: Uncollected Short Fiction, Vonnegut listed eight rules for writing a short story:

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things—reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a Sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To hell with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Vonnegut
Study Hall expansion work in progress! (at Study Hall)

Study Hall expansion work in progress! (at Study Hall)

Spring 2014

A post about Gray & Parker. Shared from Notabli.

Birthday tradition: Gray and I decided that each year we would do something special, together, just the two of us, for our birthday. This year we decided to fly a kite. It was the perfect, engaging activity for a 4yr old (and for a 34yr old). I love that Gray is now at an age where he appreciates things like this and takes pride in the fact that it is just him and his dad. Such and awesome little buddy.A post about Gray. Shared from Notabli.
Birthday tradition: Gray and I decided that each year we would do something special, together, just the two of us, for our birthday. This year we decided to fly a kite. It was the perfect, engaging activity for a 4yr old (and for a 34yr old). I love that Gray is now at an age where he appreciates things like this and takes pride in the fact that it is just him and his dad. Such and awesome little buddy.

A post about Gray. Shared from Notabli.

pregnantnotfat:

Yesterday, on the way to school, Gray and I had a little miscommunication. Sitting in his carseat, dressed and ready for school, he was giggling nonstop, and when I asked what he was laughing about he put his hands to his mouth, laughed, and said, 

'I'm SO excited that I'm not going to school today and that we're having a Mama-Gray day!'

My heart broke, as I explained to him that he was going to school, as I had to go to work.

Silence.

I looked in the rearview mirror and saw his lower lip trembling and two huge alligator tears trailing down his cheeks.

For a split second I had a silent moral debate about my child’s happiness versus my meetings, and my role in his life as a working mom. But then I snapped out of it and remembered that he loves school and his friends, and that I couldn’t miss my meetings.

With a brave little shudder he sucked it up and slowly walked into school.  I felt horrible.

So I wrapped up my workday an hour early and headed to his school…I whispered into his ear that I was sneaking him out a little early, just the two of us (Parker is down the hall in the baby room), for a special treat.

He literally skipped down the street, holding my hand and beaming, and the two of us sat down for a Mama-Gray creemee. He couldn’t believe that not only was he getting ice cream BEFORE dinner, but that it was just us.

Every once in awhile, it’s good to remember that something as simple as an afternoon ice cream can bring such joy and surprise to your child’s life. Especially your first-born, whose life has really changed a lot.

I loved it.

Love this. A great mom.